Get our Monthly Newsletter!

Lean Manufacturing and Firm Performance

2018-03-30

  • Author
    Rosemary Fullerton, Frances Kennedy, and Sally Widener


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

CONTACT: Dominic Bria

Shingo Institute

Phone: +1.435.797.0771

Email: dominic.bria@usu.edu


“Lean manufacturing and firm performance” by Rosemary Fullerton, Frances Kennedy, and Sally Widener Receives Shingo Research Award

 

Summary: After trained examiners and accomplished business professionals performed a thorough assessment of their work, Frances Kennedy, Rosemary Fullerton, and Sally Widener have been selected as recipients of an internationally recognized award from the Shingo Institute, a program in the Jon M. Huntsman School of Business. The authors will receive the award at the Shingo International Conference occurring April 9–13, 2018 in Orlando, Florida.


LOGAN, Utah — The Shingo Institute, a program in the Jon M. Huntsman School of Business at Utah State University, has awarded Frances Kennedy, Rosemary Fullerton, and Sally Widener with the Shingo Research Award for their article, “Lean manufacturing and firm performance: The incremental contribution of lean management accounting practices.” Kennedy and Widener are professors at Clemson University and Fullerton is an emeritus professor of the Utah State University School of Accountancy.


“Receipt of the Shingo Research Award signifies an author's significant impact and contribution to advancing the body of knowledge regarding operational excellence,” said Ken Snyder, executive director of the Shingo Institute.


By “challenging” or applying for an award, authors invite a group of accomplished professionals and trained examiners from the Shingo Institute to thoroughly review their research. Shingo examiners select recipients based on a rigorous set of standards.


Manufacturing firms operating in rapidly changing and highly competitive markets have embraced the continuous process improvement mindset. They have worked to improve quality, flexibility, and customer response time using the principles of Lean thinking. To reach its potential, Lean must be adopted as a holistic business strategy, rather than an activity isolated in operations. The Lean enterprise calls for the integration of Lean practices across operations and other business functions. As a critical component for achieving financial control, management accounting practices (MAP) need to be adjusted to meet the demands and objectives of Lean organizations.

“Lean manufacturing and firm performance” aims to help both researchers and practitioners better understand how Lean MAP can support operations personnel with their internal decision making, and operations executives and business leaders in their objective of increasing Lean operations performance as part of a holistic Lean enterprise strategy. Survey data from 244 U.S. manufacturing firms is used to construct a structural equation model. The authors document that the extent of Lean manufacturing implementation is associated with the use of Lean MAP, and further, that the Lean MAP are related in a systematic way. In order to derive the greatest impact on performance, results indicate that operations management cannot operate in a vacuum. Instead, operations and accounting personnel must partner with each other to ensure that Lean MAP are strategically integrated into the Lean culture.


“Lean manufacturing and firm performance” appears in the Journal of Operations Management, which is currently ranked as the leading journal in Management Science & Operations Research among 156 journals by Scimago. As of February 2018, the article has been cited 130 times, many of these citations corresponding to master and doctoral theses.


Kennedy, Fullerton, and Widener will receive their award at the awards ceremony during the Shingo Conference in Orlando, Florida, USA on April 9–13, 2018. The conference is a week-long event featuring a selection of workshops, plant tours, keynote speakers and breakout sessions designed to provide ongoing knowledge, insights and experience for organizations in pursuit of operational excellence.


About the Shingo Institute

The Shingo Institute is home of the Shingo Prize, an award that recognizes organizations that demonstrate an exceptional culture that fosters continuous improvement. A program in the Jon M. Huntsman School of Business at Utah State University, the Shingo Institute is named after Japanese industrial engineer and Toyota advisor, Shigeo Shingo. Dr. Shingo distinguished himself as one of the world’s thought leaders in concepts, management systems and improvement techniques that have become known as the Toyota Production System.


Drawing from Dr. Shingo’s teachings and years of experience working with organizations worldwide, the Shingo Institute developed the Shingo Model™ which is the basis for its several educational offerings, including workshops, study tours and conferences. Workshops are available in multiple languages through the Institute’s licensed affiliates. For more information on workshops, affiliates, or to register to attend the next Shingo Conference, please visit www.shingo.org.


About the Shingo Institute

Housed at the Jon M. Huntsman School of Business at Utah State University, the Shingo Institute is named after Japanese industrial engineer Shigeo Shingo. Shingo distinguished himself as one of the world's thought leaders in concepts, management systems and improvement techniques that have become known as the Toyota Business System. Drawing from Shingo's teachings and years of experience working with organizations throughout the world, the Shingo Institute has developed the Shingo Model™ which is the basis for several educational offerings including workshops, study tours and conferences. It also awards and recognizes organizations that demonstrate an exceptional culture that continually strives for improvement and progress. Those interested in more information or in registering to attend the 30th International Shingo Conference may visit www.shingo.org.