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Lean Math: Figuring to Improve

2017-09-07

  • Author
    Mark Hamel and Michael O'Connor


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
CONTACT:   Dominic Bria
Shingo Institute
Phone: +1.435.797.0771
Email: dominic.bria@usu.edu
 
“Lean Math: Figuring to Improve” by Mark Hamel and Michael O’Connor Receives Shingo Publication Award
 
Summary: After trained examiners and accomplished business professionals performed a thorough assessment of their work, Mark Hamel and Michael O’Connor have been selected as recipients of an internationally recognized award from the Shingo Institute, a program in the Jon M. Huntsman School of Business. The authors will receive the award at the Shingo International Conference occurring April 9-13, 2018 in Orlando, Florida.
 
LOGAN, Utah — The Shingo Institute, a program in the Jon M. Huntsman School of Business at Utah State University, has awarded Mark Hamel and Michael O’Connor with the Shingo Publication Award for their book, “Lean Math: Figuring to Improve.” Hamel is partner and COO at The Murli Group and now a two-time Shingo Publication Award-winning author, as well as a blogger and speaker. O’Connor is an internationally recognized continuous improvement expert, author and Lean Six Sigma consultant.
 
“Receipt of the Shingo Publication Award signifies an author's significant contribution and practical application to the body of knowledge regarding enterprise excellence,” said Ken Snyder, executive director of the Shingo Institute.
 
By “challenging” or applying for an award, authors invite a group of accomplished professionals and trained examiners from the Shingo Institute to thoroughly review their publications. Shingo examiners select recipients based on a rigorous set of standards.
 
Lean transformations are decidedly more challenging when the math is inconsistent with Lean principles, misapplied, or just plain wrong. Math should never get in the way of a Lean transformation, but instead should facilitate it. “Lean Math” is the indispensable reference for this very purpose. A single, comprehensive source, the book presents standard and specialized approaches to tackling the math required of Lean and Six Sigma practitioners across all industries, seasoned and newly minted practitioners alike.
 
“Lean Math” features more than 160 thoughtfully organized entries. Ten chapters cover system-oriented math, time, the “-ilities” (availability, repeatability, stability, etc.), work, inventory, performance metrics, basic math and hypothesis testing, measurement, experimentation and more. Two appendices cover standard work for analyzing data and understanding and dealing with variation. Practitioners will quickly locate the precise entry(ies) that is relevant to the problem or continuous improvement opportunity at hand. Each entry not only provides background on the related Lean principles, formulas, examples, figures and tables, but also tips, cautions, cross-references to other associated entries, and the occasional “Gemba Tale” that shares real-world experiences. The book consistently encourages the practitioner to engage in math-assisted plan-do-check-act (PDCA) cycles. “Lean Math” truly transcends the numbers by reinforcing and refreshing lean thinking for the very purpose of "Figuring to Improve."
 
Greg Lane, an international Lean transformation coach, speaker and author says, “’Lean Math’ is a comprehensive reference book within which the Lean practitioner can quickly find straightforward examples illustrating how to perform almost any Lean calculation. Equally useful, it imparts the importance of the relevant Lean principle(s).” Lane continues, “While coaching some recent transformation efforts, I put ‘Lean Math’ to the test by asking several novice practitioners to reference it during their work. They were promptly rewarded with deeper insight and effectiveness—a reflection of this book’s utility and value to the Lean practitioner.”
 
Tim Pettry, senior process improvement specialist at the Cleveland Clinic says, “’Lean Math’ fills a huge gap in the continuous improvement library, helping practitioners to translate data, activities, and ideas into meaningful information for effective experimentation and intelligent decisions. This reference comes at a critical time for the healthcare industry as we struggle to improve quality, while controlling costs. Though we don’t make widgets, our people, processes and patients will benefit from the tools provided in this reference. The numerous examples, as well as the Gemba Tales scattered throughout the book, bring life to the principles and formulas. ‘Lean Math’ is impressive in both scope and presentation of content.”
 
Hamel and O’Connor will receive their award at the awards ceremony during the Shingo Conference in Orlando, Florida, USA on April 9-13, 2018. The conference is a week-long event featuring a selection of workshops, plant tours, keynote speakers and breakout sessions designed to provide ongoing knowledge, insights and experience for organizations in pursuit of operational excellence.
 
About the Shingo Institute
The Shingo Institute is home of the Shingo Prize, an award that recognizes organizations that demonstrate an exceptional culture that fosters continuous improvement. A program in the Jon M. Huntsman School of Business at Utah State University, the Shingo Institute is named after Japanese industrial engineer and Toyota advisor, Shigeo Shingo. Dr. Shingo distinguished himself as one of the world’s thought leaders in concepts, management systems and improvement techniques that have become known as the Toyota Production System.
 
Drawing from Dr. Shingo’s teachings and years of experience working with organizations worldwide, the Shingo Institute developed the Shingo Model™ which is the basis for its several educational offerings, including workshops, study tours and conferences. Workshops are available in multiple languages through the Institute’s licensed affiliates. For more information on workshops, affiliates, or to register to attend the next Shingo Conference, please visit www.shingo.org.
 
About the Shingo Institute

Housed at the Jon M. Huntsman School of Business at Utah State University, the Shingo Institute is named after Japanese industrial engineer Shigeo Shingo. Shingo distinguished himself as one of the world's thought leaders in concepts, management systems and improvement techniques that have become known as the Toyota Business System. Drawing from Shingo's teachings and years of experience working with organizations throughout the world, the Shingo Institute has developed the Shingo Model™ which is the basis for several educational offerings including workshops, study tours and conferences. It also awards and recognizes organizations that demonstrate an exceptional culture that continually strives for improvement and progress. Those interested in more information or in registering to attend the 30th International Shingo Conference may visit www.shingo.org.